lummi island wine tasting nov 11-12 ’22

Hours this weekend: 4-6pm both Friday and Saturday

Though Covid protocols have relaxed somewhat, the season of outside seating seems to be pretty much over. So as we move inside, let’s be mindful of distance between us and subdue any tendencies toward those, um, exclamatory expectorants that can come with getting a little too boisterous. Thanks!

 

Friday Bread Pickup This Week  4-5:30 pm

Black Pepper Walnut- Made with a nice mix of bread flour, fresh milled whole wheat and rye. A fair amount of black pepper and toasted walnuts give this bread great flavor with a distinct peppery bite. Excellent paired with all sorts of meats and cheese…and wine, of course! – $5/loaf

Le Pave d’Autrefois translates roughly as old paving stones. A ciabatta-like bread with a lot of hydration so is simply divided into approximate squares – hence the paving stones name. Made with a mix of bread flour, fresh milled whole wheat, rye, and buckwheat flours for a lot of hearty whole grain goodness.  -$5/loaf

mmm, and pastry this week…

Pain aux Raisin– Uses the same laminated dough as croissants. The dough is rolled out, spread with pastry cream and sprinkled with a mix of golden raisins and dried cranberries soaked in sugar syrup. Rolled up and sliced before baking. – 2/$5

To get on the bread order list, click on the Contact Us link above and fill out the form. Each week’s bread menu is sent to the list each Sunday, for ordering by Tuesday, for pickup on Friday. Simple, right..? If you will be visiting the island and would like to order bread for your visit, at least a week’s notice is recommended for pickup the following Friday.

 

Wine of the Week: Martoccia Poggio Apricale  ’21    Italy  $17

  click image to watch video

Clean, bright, and pretty, Poggio Apricale is the everyday offering from high
altitude Brunello producer, Luca Brunelli. Built on a foundation of Sangiovese
Grosso (the varietal in Brunello), this ripe, unoaked rosso supplies terrific “grip” for such a freshly-styled
wine. Classic Tuscan aromas of morello cherry, sage, blackberry, and warm terra
cotta fill the glass, along with a supple, approachable mid-palate. A small
production wine from a very small estate, this is artisanal wine at its charming, low
yield best.

Economics of the Heart: Maintaining the Circular Flow

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-hn61wuDjgUg/WhS13GzrKoI/AAAAAAAAieo/AhXyXKxr6dgFCCdASyunfwxD12iYr3TsgCLcBGAs/s1600/Circular-flow-diagram.jpg

courtesy https://2.bp.blogspot.com

In the first page or two of any beginning economics text there is a chart of the Circular Flow of an economic system. People get money by selling their labor to business and government so they can produce goods and services. People then spend the money buying those goods and services back from producers. Everyone has money coming in from one side, and money going out the other. As long as everyone is included and keeps passing the money, the flow goes on everyone is okay.

The central takeaway from the diagram is the interdependence of consumers and producers. Everyone has to keep working, producing, buying, and selling to keep the economy going. On a macro scale like a big city, state, or country, there are large numbers of producers, workers, buyers, and sellers in a constant flux of competition and cooperation.

However, in a rural community like our little island, we all buy most of our goods and services on the mainland or have them delivered via the ferry. Every day (Mondays especially) a parade of trucks and vans comes off the ferry to deliver various goods and services to island households. Our island economy is completely dependent on the ferry for food, fuel, waste disposal, home repair, mail service, package delivery, propane, and more. 

Therefore it has been a sudden shock to our senses to learn that just a month ago a decision was made…somewhere... (we on LIFAC* still have not seen the documents) that because of the proximity of eel grass beds (a protected plant species) to the mainland ferry dock, the barge platform necessary for constructing the planned new ferry dock there will not be allowed to anchor over nearby eel grass beds. Instead, the barge will have to be moored inside the ferry docking area during construction (meaning no car ferry, and a clumsy loading platform for a passenger vessel).

Further, because of seasonal restrictions on marine construction (the annual “fish window”) construction work will have to be confined to the period from October to February, when the days are often short, cold, wet, and windy, and construction could take six months or more!

County officials say this problem is completely independent of the size of the planned vessel, which is on the order of three times the size of our 60-yr-old Chief. They also say that the recent RAISE grant award from USDOT is tied very tightly to the parameters of the 34-car vessel described in the grant, a disappointment to those of us who have championed a much smaller, less expensive, and greener vessel. (So it goes, as Kurt Vonnegut was fond of saying)…at least it will be a diesel-electric hybrid, and we will all be working toward eventually generating the power for it here on the Island.

All of this is complicated by the fact that the terminal area is owned by Lummi Nation, which has its own rights, goals, and sensibilities. At the moment my preliminary view is that if the prohibitions stand and there can be no car ferry during construction, then construction should be phased over a couple of years with no more than three weeks at a time with no car ferry…something our community experiences annually for drydock maintenance. Longer than that without the necessary resupply activities that make life on the island possible at all seems like something “most devoutly to be eschewed…” **

Stay tuned…!

*Lummi Island Ferry Advisory Committee
** K. Adlard Coles, author of Heavy Weather Sailing about “experiencing a hurricane from the deck of a sailboat…”

 

This Week’s $10 Wine Tasting

Girot Ribot Masia Parera Brut Rose Cava  Italy    $16
Delicate perlage, deep minerality, and intoxicating white flower and baby mushroom aromas make this wine memorable and delightful.

Montfaucon Cotes du Rhone ’18    France    $15
50% Grenache co-fermented on skins with syrah, cinsault, & old vines carignan and matured in concrete tanks; beautiful aromas of cherries, black currant; fresh and round on the palate.

Martoccia Poggio Apricale  ’21    Italy  $16
Sangiovese Grosso with a little Merlot and Cab Franc; Fruity and persistent nose of wild berries and spice. Soft and balanced with fine tannins to make this Sant’Antimo Rosso work well with any meal!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wine Tasting
Comments Off on lummi island wine tasting nov 4-5 ’22

lummi island wine tasting nov 4-5 ’22

Hours this weekend: 4-6pm both Friday and Saturday

Though Covid protocols have relaxed somewhat, the season of outside seating seems to be pretty much over. So as we move inside, let’s be mindful of distance between us and subdue any tendencies toward those, um, exclamatory expectorants that can come with getting a little too boisterous. Thanks!

 

Friday Bread Pickup This Week  4-5:30 pm

Four Seed Buttermilk – This bread includes all the elements of whole wheat, but does so separately by adding cracked wheat and bran in to the bread flour instead of milling whole wheat berries. It also has buttermilk and oil which will make for a tender bread as well as adding a little tang. Finally it is finished with with a bit of honey and sunflower pumpkin and sesame seeds and some toasted millet – $5/loaf

Fig Anise – One of the more popular breads in the rotation. Made with a sponge that is fermented overnight, then the final dough is mixed with bread flour and fresh milled whole wheat. Honey, dried figs and anise bring in all the flavors of the mediterranean. – $5/loaf

mmm, and pastry this week…

Chocolate Babka Rolls – A sweet pastry dough full of eggs, butter and sugar, rolled and spread with a chocolate filling, rolled up and cut into individual rolls that are placed in baking forms for baking and then brushed with sugar syrup after baking. – 2/$5

To get on the bread order list, click on the Contact Us link above and fill out the form. Each week’s bread menu is sent to the list each Sunday, for ordering by Tuesday, for pickup on Friday. Simple, right..? If you will be visiting the island and would like to order bread for your visit, at least a week’s notice is recommended for pickup the following Friday.

 

Photos

On the occasion of Pat’s birthday we trekked to Portland (Sherwood, to be precise) to celebrate it with son and grandson. We had a great dinner at Mason, a tiny Italian restaurant with amazing food and wine. Absolutely terrific dinner, superbly accompanied by a bottle of 2003 Quilceda Creek cab (Parker gave it 100 pts, and we have to concur!)

Also a view of Wednesday sunset at Padilla Bay reflected in our back window, and a subtle yin-yang shape in — where else–  the bottom of a wine glass!

Nana Pat’s Birthday dinner

Padilla Bay reflections

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

yin yang wine glass…!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Economics of the Heart: Our ‘Sword of Damocles’ Moment

AThe Medieval Knight Sword (#1306) - Darksword Armoryn ancient Greek story tells of a tyrannical King (Dionysius) who was feared and obeyed but also hated. His inability to imagine another way of ruling made him quite paranoid (although in his case they probably were out to get him!) and caused him to take extraordinary measures to protect himself from treachery.

When Damocles, one of his loyal followers, complimented him on how happy and contented his wealth, power, and position must make him, he grew irritated, because he was neither. To give Damocles a sense of his everyday burden, he indulged him in luxuries of food, drink, and comfort, which young Damocles very much enjoyed…until he became aware that above his head dangled a great sword, hanging by a single horsehair which might break at any moment to kill or maim him. Thus did he learn, and does the parable teach, how living under constant threat of injury takes a toll.

Next week’s election has us all in a Sword of Damocles moment. Our country and to some degree the entire world are at present divided into irreconcilable political camps of Authoritarians vs. Humanists. Authoritarians believe the natural order of human society is for One Tough Guy and his loyal lieutenants to control how power and wealth are allocated, and that objective Truth is whatever the Leader pronounces it to be. Humanists believe that all human beings share the same needs for safety, affection, attention, approval, and equal opportunity to live healthy and satisfying lives, and that Truth is that which can be verified by observation, repetition, and analysis.

For 250 years our nation has struggled toward inclusion, fairness, justice, and equal opportunities of all citizens to share in a common prosperity. But over the  past 50 years, authoritarians have been at work to sabotage this long American effort with their own visions of white male supremacy and its associated religions. In today’s world it has become perfectly clear that Republicans have abandoned democracy in favor of authoritarianism; today’s Republicans would repeal the Bill of Rights in a heartbeat.

We see behind us in our nation a stained tapestry of deals, trades, treachery, lies, murders, ambition, and the unbridled vanity we call “politics.” We see in front of us a particularly virulent form of the political disease, wherein a massive subculture has been created over the past forty years which is completely unwilling or unable to distinguish fact from fiction or truth from lies, and which sees the Constitution as a constraint, not a sacred commitment.

So. For another week or so we will sip our tea (or wine!) with an uneasy eye to the precarious Sword over our heads while our collective lemming culture decides whether to sigh in relief and go home to a nice warm fire or throw ourselves collectively over a cliff into a cold and raging sea. Fingers crossed!

 

This Week’s $10 Wine Tasting

Marchetti Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico ’19         Italy       $14
Verdicchio/ Malvasia blend using only free-run juice; pale straw color with green overtones; intense bouquet of citrus, lemon zest, and floral notes,with complex fruity character, and crisp, well-balanced palate.

Saviah The Jack Syrah ’18   Washington    $15
85% Syrah, 10% Grenache, 5% Mourvèdre; Appealing aromas and flavors of red and black fruit, violets, olives, anise, and meat, with a velvety, pleasing texture.

La Quercia Montepulciano d’Abruzzo  Riserva Colline Teramine ’17     Italy      $26
From 50-yr-old vines; rich, full-bodied and rustic in expression, with rich notes of cocoa, rhubarb, blackberry, and herbs; long, lingering finish of juicy black cherry, with a silky/velvety mouthfeel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wine Tasting
Comments Off on lummi island wine tasting oct 21-22

lummi island wine tasting oct 21-22

Hours this weekend: 4-6pm both Friday and Saturday

Voluntary Covid protocols remain in place while the weather permits outside seating. Please use discretion and kindness in protecting your own safety and that of others, thanks!

Also note: though there WILL BE BREAD PICKUP NEXT FRIDAY, Oct 28, the wine shop will be CLOSED both Friday and Saturday, Oct 28-29.

 

Friday Bread Pickup This Week  4-5:30 pm

Poolish Ale – the preferment here is also a poolish, made with bread flour, a bit of yeast and a nice ale beer for the liquid and fermented overnight. Mixed the next day with bread flour and fresh milled whole wheat. This makes a great all around bread with a nice crisp crust – $5/loaf

Buckwheat Walnut & Honey – A flavorful artisan bread made with a poolish preferment, fresh milled buckwheat, and bread flour. Though buckwheat contains no gluten, this bread is not gluten free as it also includes bread flour made from wheat. Buckwheat has an earthy flavor that in this bread is balanced with a little honey and toasted walnut; goes well with meats and cheeses – $5/loaf

and mmm, pastry this week…

Chocolate Croissants – a traditional laminated french pastry made with a bit of sourdough flavor and another pre-ferment to help strengthen the dough to create the traditional honeycomb interior. Rolled out and shaped with delicious dark chocolate in the center. – 2/$5

To get on the bread order list, click on the Contact Us link above and fill out the form. Each week’s bread menu is sent to the list each Sunday, for ordering by Tuesday, for pickup on Friday. Simple, right..? If you will be visiting the island and would like to order bread for your visit, at least a week’s notice is recommended for pickup the following Friday.

 

Wine of the Week: Sineann Merlot ’19     Washington    $28

Though the Sineann winery is in Oregon, much of its fruit is sourced from top Washington vineyards. The following notes on this wine, taken directly from the Sineann website, tell its story in the winemaker’s own words.

“We almost decided to stop bottling a varietal Merlot.  Despite making excellent Merlot off the Hillside Vineyard year after year, slow sales of the wine had us leaning towards abandoning it.

Merlot has been sabotaged in the marketplace by overpriced, under-fruited wines for years.  That is what originally drove us to reduce crop size – the goal of producing a truly worthy Merlot to help resurrect its name.  The wines we made have shown their stuff.  The older ones have aged beautifully.

Then along came Merlot from Champoux Vineyard.  We started getting Merlot from Paul Champoux in 2005.  Wow!  True to form, his vineyard delivers dark, rich (to the point of voluptuous), powerful wines.

No way we were not going to bottle this alone as a varietal!  We’ve kept that up over many vintages, now sourcing fruit from Phinny Hill Vineyards – right across from the Champoux Vineyard…this is what Merlot can be: dark, supple, complex, powerful.  We wish there were more of it!

 

Economics of the Heart: The One-Item Republican Platform: Toxic Masculinity

cartoon courtesy of Steve Greenberg, 1983

It has been at least since 2015 since Republicans abandoned any actual political platform. In the fifties they were all in with the John Birch Society, Joe McCarthy’s Communist Witch Hunt (where have we heard that before?), and claiming Ike as their own (but he wasn’t!). In the sixties and seventies they claimed they stood for that growing military-industrial complex Ike warned us about when he left office in 1961. But it was Reagan who deliberately threw the poor, the sick, and the mentally ill out of the New Deal lifeboat and began robbing the poor to benefit the rich as a national policy which endured until 2008.

While those policies were plenty mean-spirited enough in the Reagan years, it was the Gingrich Speakership in the 90’s that started turning the Republican platform into something actually Toxic, focused almost entirely not on a positive platform of beliefs and goals for the nation, but an ongoing negative campaign to end the New Deal once and for all and reduce the less economically fortunate to chronic poverty.

As we have lamented many times before, it has been the Republican sense of corporate Entitlement to gross and ugly excess profits that has defined it since Reagan. Devoid of any ethical underpinnings, the party under the Tweetster stands for nothing except wielding power. There has been no official Party platform since the Romney campaign in 2012. All that’s left are name-calling, criminal conspiracy, a nonstop torrent of lies from right wing media, and its latest variant, “toxic masculinity.” 

As we approach what is likely to be the most consequential election in our history on Nov 8, we pause to take a brief look at two elements of the toxic political landscape.

While it has become fashionable for Republicans to whine about high gasoline prices and blame Biden for the global inflation actually brought on by two years of pandemic isolation, only about 3% of current inflation in the US is attributable to Federal policies. In yesterday’s Daily Kos, Rep. Katie Porter pulled out her economic charts and brought us all up to date on what has really been going on:  1) https://twitter.com/i/status/1582475617723113472  2) https://twitter.com/i/status/1582802684393816065 .

The takeaway from her analysis is that Corporate America was quick to see Covid as an excuse for exorbitant price hikes that had nothing to do with increased costs and everything to do with a golden opportunity to rip off their customers and blame it on”Biden’s inflation.” As the article notes, “Few have pointed out that corporate profits have shot through the roof at the exact same time and to such a degree that saying our current ‘inflation’ wasn’t manufactured by big business greed is laughable.” Even our local car wash raised its fee by $3 not because water was more expensive, but “because it could.” In economic theory this is called ( I am not making this up) “the bandwagon effect.”

Our other recommended piece is from prolific WaPo opinion writer Jennifer Rubin on the uniform adoption of Republican leaders of “toxic masculinity,” roughly translating to an ongoing “aggression divorced from virtue…turning bullying into strength (and) restraint into vice.” It seems to have taken hold across the party, a toxic denial of the virtues typically characterized as “masculine:” courage, strength, and honor. Indeed, she points out, the lot of them have regressed to cowering careerists who have thrown away their honor for a nod from the Tweetster. Or, as another female writer and “Never Trumper” put it, “Trump has emasculated every other Republican by demanding that they all become weak in his service.”

We have no idea how this election will turn out. We do know that if Republicans control even one branch of the legislature, they will make choices that serve their own political and economic interests, not their constituents’ and not their nation’s.

 

This Week’s $10 Wine Tasting

Cloudlift Viognier/Marsanne/Rousanne  ’20     Washington    $22
Aromas of white flowers and honeysuckle lead to well-defined flavors of melon and pear, a full bodied palate and ample acidity.

MAN Vintners Pinotage ’18   South Africa    $11
Aromas of dark coffee beans, red berries, nutmeg, and vanilla spice turning to dark berries and smoky plum; rustic yet silky and juicy, with smooth tannins, balanced acidity, and comforting intensity.

Sineann Merlot ’19     Washington    $28
Deep and dark, with nose of red berries, tobacco and chocolate, typical tannic structure, and  elegant balsamic notes, well-balanced and soft, pairing well with well-seasoned meats and sauces.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wine Tasting
Comments Off on lummi island wine tasting oct 14-15 ’22

lummi island wine tasting oct 14-15 ’22

Hours this weekend: 4-6pm both Friday and Saturday

Voluntary Covid protocols remain in place while the weather permits outside seating. Please use discretion and kindness in protecting your own safety and that of others, thanks!

 

Friday Bread Pickup This Week  4-5:30 pm

Pain au Levain – Made with a nice mix of bread flour and freshly milled whole wheat and rye flours. After building the sourdough and mixing the final dough it gets a long cool overnight ferment in the refrigerator. This really allows the flavor to develop in this bread. – $5/loaf

Cinnamon Raisin – Fermented overnight with a poolish of bread and  rye flours before mixing with freshly milled whole wheat and rolled oats. Some honey for sweetness, a little milk for a tender crumb and loaded with raisins and a healthy dose of cinnamon. The cinnamon is mixed into the dough and flavors the entire bread for a hearty rustic loaf. – $5/loaf

and mmm, pastry this week…

Individual Cinnamon Rolls –Made with a rich sweet roll dough full of eggs, butter and sugar. The dough is rolled out, spread with pastry cream and sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. Then rolled up and sliced into individual rolls for baking. And boy are they delicious! – 2/$5.

To get on the bread order list, click on the Contact Us link above and fill out the form. Each week’s bread menu is sent to the list each Sunday, for ordering by Tuesday, for pickup on Friday. Simple, right..? If you will be visiting the island and would like to order bread for your visit, at least a week’s notice is recommended for pickup the following Friday.

 

Wines of the Week:  Selections from Small Vineyards

Once or twice a year we attend a sit-down tasting for the next SV shipments about six months later. Last spring’s order has arrived and we are pouring three selections this weekend. Member wineries are generally small, family-owned operations in Italy with deep, multi-generational roots in their vineyards, and their wines typically over-deliver for their generally modest price points.  Read more about Small Vineyards.

Batasiolo Gavi ’20     Italy   
Cortese grapes from limestone, clay and marl soils are destemmed and soft pressed; clear, bright, straw yellow with green tinges, fresh floral aromas, dry and fresh on the palate with lingering, characteristic notes of almonds.

Tre Donne D’Arc Langhe Rosso ’18   Italy   $20
Blend of oak-aged Barbera, and Pinot Nero with unoaked Dolcetto and Freisa that makes for a lively, fresh wine with rich, moody fruit, bracing purity, and fascinating depth.

Tre Donne Langhe Nebbiolo 
Deep and dark, with nose of red berries, tobacco and chocolate, typical tannic structure, and  elegant balsamic notes, well-balanced and soft, pairing well with well-seasoned meats and sauces.

 

Economics of the Heart:  The Case Against the Tweetster

High Noon - Rotten Tomatoes

image courtesy of https://www.rottentomatoes.com

Back in the mid-fifties, on many Saturday afternoons, a bunch the kids 0n our street would walk downtown (about a mile) to one of the three old theaters that showed Saturday matinees. Typical fare would include some combination of previews of coming films, a cartoon, a newsreel, maybe a serial episode, and a movie (often a Western!)

One summer for several weeks there was a lengthy preview hyping High Noon, a Western starring big-name actor Gary Cooper. The preview was dripping with tension about an approaching Showdown between Cooper and the Bad Guy. The theme song was “Do not forsake me, oh my Darling.”  So of course when it came to the theater our little neighborhood of fourth-graders trudged down to see it.

Well…while there was definitely tension, it lasted so unbearably long and repetitively (Cooper walking down empty street…clock ticking…Cooper walking down empty street…clock ticking…Cooper walking down empty street…clock ticking, etc., etc.)  After all that walking down empty streets in the noonday sun, the final showdown didn’t amount to much.

Today we listened to the last live hearing of the House January 6 Committee as it laid out chapter and verse of not only how the Tweetster planned, staged, directed, caused, encouraged, and executed not just the January 6 insurrection to overturn the 2020 election result, but also directed the entire plan beginning many months before the election. At the end of the session the panel voted unanimously invite the Tweetster to meet with them to discuss his role in directing the effort to overturn the election.

In an ordinary world, the hearing would have closed with a video of the Tweetster being arrested and hauled away to jail pending trial. Clearly this has not been an ordinary world since about 2015. At the moment most of the Republican Party is demonstrably committed to overthrowing the Constitution of the United States, and it is up to everyone else to suit up and fight back. The future of this country and the entire planet depend on this nation’s will and ability to remove these conspirators from office and send them all to the brig for a very long time.

The revelations of the Jan 6 committee have revealed in granular detail the breadth and commitment of the conspiracy to do away with Constitutional government in our country. These facts, in addition to the shredding of the Constitution now underway by an ultra-right Supreme Court, underline that there is already a Civil War going on in our country, and the sad truth is we all need to take sides and, as their leader said, “fight like hell or we won’t have a country anymore.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wine Tasting